Frank and Ollie

1995

Documentary

5
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 88%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 90%
IMDb Rating 7.9 10 469

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Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
March 23, 2019 at 04:59 AM

Cast

720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
775.22 MB
1280*714
English 2.0
PG
23.976 fps
1 hr 29 min
P/S 0 / 3
1.44 GB
1920*1072
English 2.0
PG
23.976 fps
1 hr 29 min
P/S 0 / 2

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by MartinHafer 8 / 10

Is it a must-see? No...but it is a very interesting and sweet story about friendship and animation.

This documentary is about Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston--two animators from the so-called 'group of nine'. These were the important animators who worked for Disney through its classic days and helped to make the great full-length pictures* that made the studio even more famous. In addition, they were the two surviving members of the group AND were amazingly close friends...among the closest you ever could hear about and this is very touching. The film was made by Frank's son, Theodore--and Theodore went on to make some other touching and interesting documentaries, such as "Walt & El Groupo".

While at times the film seemed a bit vague when it came to the story AND I assume there was much more that I would like to have heard from the guys, it is a delightful film and well worth seeing. And, although Frank & Ollie seemed very elderly in the film, they both went on to live another decade or more after "Frank and Ollie" debuted. An amazingly nice and sweet film.

Reviewed by mtsierraprofgpb 10 / 10

Must see background for aspiring animators

"Their friendship changed the face of animation." What is interesting is that these two were planning on anything but becoming animators much less becoming innovators in the profession. They met at Stanford as college students and took road trips to a distant college to do nudes because Stanford would not allow "such behavior" in their art department (imagine that today). Somewhere during these trips a lasting friendship was built between them. The "painted for dinner and played piano for beer" along the way on these trips and seem to have made many friends in the places they frequented as well. Their lack of fear, presence of love and capacity to laugh at themselves opened one door after another. I was amused time and again to see them model the characters they created. It was also quite interesting to see how they climbed inside of their characters and brought them to life. It was apparent to me that they enjoyed what they were doing and in-so-doing were blessed to be eternally youthful. I am hard pressed to think of another friendship that would allow two human beings to share so much without petty jealousy getting in the way. Their wives were incredibly understanding about the childlike ways and seemed to understand what a blessing their husbands were, not only to their family, but to the world in general. There is not a country on the face of this earth that has not seen one of their characters, I would suppose. I would also gather that they have touched many millions of young hearts over the years. A young heart, by the way, need not be in a young body. That was apparent in this film as well. I will never see Disneyland the same, because behind each of the characters that I see, I will imagine the facial expressions of these two men. I will remember that one got his best ideas while shaving and developed the ideas while walking on a worn path in his front yard. They did talk about artistic frustration brought on by the fact that they were so involved and connected to what they do. It was also interesting to note that their release from tension was also artistically motivated and expressed through music and model railroading. I thoroughly enjoyed this viewing and will never forget the wisdom chiseled into the faces and depth sparkling from the eyes of these two wonderful human beings.

Reviewed by Jeremy Bristol 9 / 10

Really good--if you're interested in the subject.

The problem with documentaries is that, short of "The Sorrow and the Pity" and "Nanook of the North," most of them are only interesting if you have a fascination with the subject. Me, I'm into dinosaurs, flight, and movies. But I guess most of all I'm interested in animation, so "Frank and Ollie" is right up my alley, even though it could be argued that a movie like this (written, directed, and produced by Frank Thomas' son, Theodore) isn't really important or in any way art.

First of all, this isn't really a Disney picture, despite the fact that Disney released it--there is not the same tone of self-congratulatory propaganda (i.e. Disney is Great/Remember the Magic) that Disney-done documentaries such as the Making of Fantasia featurette from the Fantasia DVD (in which, other than the descriptions of the techniques, the only interesting thing actually said is that Leonard Maltin used to watch the Rite of Spring section in Science class) tend to have. This is evident in the first few minutes of the movie, when various nude drawings the animators drew in college are shown. This is as much a documentary on the two animators (as mundane as some of their details may be) as it is about Disney.

One of the most interesting things revealed by Frank and Ollie is how all the animators used to draw caricatures of each other to get their creative juices flowing (and to blow off steam).

Again, a movie like this is only interesting if you enjoy the subject. I don't like basketball, so I don't care for Hoop Dreams. But if you enjoy animation of any sort, "Frank and Ollie" might just suit you fine, too. 9/10.

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