The Irishman

2019

Biography / Crime / Drama

72
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 96%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 86%
IMDb Rating 8.7 10 14589

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
November 29, 2019 at 07:03 PM

Cast

Robert De Niro as Frank Sheeran
Jesse Plemons as Chuckie O'Brien
Anna Paquin as Peggy Sheeran
Al Pacino as Jimmy Hoffa
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1.79 GB
1280*682
English
R
24 fps
3hr 29 min
P/S 4,290 / 2,322
3.25 GB
1920*1024
English
R
24 fps
3hr 29 min
P/S 3,646 / 1,599

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by TarekEl-Sherbeny 10 / 10

Oh god De Niro's phone call oh god!

"What kind of a man makes a phone call like that!" It Happened! I've watched it! Quite simply, The Best Film of the Year! No, of the Last 3 Years! The hype is real, set your expectations as high as you can possibly reach!

Let me tell you something, I'm 25 years old and I didn't really got the chance to live the era of Masterpieces, I didn't see Raging Bull/Goodfellas/Dog Day Afternoon at its time, I didn't experience how its like to watch the best actors of all time in their fully artistic command. The first time I've watched Raging Bull I truly envied those people who lived in the 80s, I was always wishing if time can just go back and see De Niro's rage or hear Pacino's Attica once in a theater! But guess what, It happened!

This is the end of the era! The summation of Scorsese/De Niro/Pesci/ Pacino career, a final statement by masters! Robert De Niro is EXPLOSIVE! sorry but no chance for Joaquin Phoenix this year for a win! Pacino/Pesci are unexpectedly MARVELOUS! Scorsese's second Oscar, it's officially! Zaillian's screenplay is on point, you can't go wrong with him. A 3.5 hour film without a single dragging minute, a poem of friendship, betrayal, regret and time!

Reviewed by Jeremy_Urquhart 10 / 10

It's brilliant, but best to go in with as few expectations as possible

When I love a movie as much as I loved The Irishman, I feel torn. On one hand, I want to review it and rave about it and try to convince others to see it. But then on the other hand, I realise that doing so could set expectations too high, which could then lead to some people getting disappointed (this happens a lot with horror movies that get hyped at film festivals and then rejected by disappointed wide audiences, like with The Witch, It Follows, and Hereditary).

So that leaves me in a tricky situation, and I'll compromise by praising the film as much as I can without overhyping, whilst also making vague comments that won't be specific enough to ruin what the film has to offer (because yes: it's a Scorsese film. He has an incredibly varied filmography when you break down just what he's made over the last half-century, and so you're never going to get exactly what you'd expect).

Okay, acting: phenomenal. Besides Goodfellas, Pesci's best performance ever. This is the best De Niro's been since Cape Fear. This is the best Al Pacino has been in at least three decades. These men are old, and all accomplished and wealthy enough to retire happily at this point, but thankfully they all agreed to not only star in this movie, but commit themselves 100%. No one's phoning it in here. While the supporting cast are uniformly solid, these three steal the show and I hope all get Oscar nominations come awards season.

Scorsese, to no one's surprise, directs brilliantly throughout, making every scene purposeful and captivating. The movie is long, but deservedly so. The various pay-offs towards the film's conclusion would not hit nearly as hard if the film didn't spend so long building character, suspense, and emotion.

As crude as it might sound, this movie- at about the halfway point- made me forget how badly I needed to use the theatre's restroom. At a certain point, I accepted that I couldn't miss a second, and leaving the room for even a moment was totally out of the question.

If you can see this at a cinema, and can handle three and a half hours without a toilet or snack break (no intermission!), then by all means, watch it on a big screen, because it's beautiful and ultimately the best way to experience a film of this scope and spectacle. But it'll be on Netflix soon, and perhaps some would prefer to watch it in the comfort of their own home, where snack/toilet breaks are possible.

Whatever you do, make sure you ultimately watch it. Films like this don't come around too often, and this is such a perfect swan-song for this talented group that I doubt we'll see these legends together again.

It's bittersweet, but if this is Scorsese's, De Niro's, Pacino's and Pesci's farewell to the crime genre, then it's an amazing note to go out on.

Reviewed by aGlassofCinema_com 9 / 10

The Scorsese format still works decades later.

I was able to attend the NYC premiere this afternoon. Now that I've gotten over the shock of seeing so many celebrities, I'm able to happily to say that this movie, while being quite long, deserves to be remembered as one of Scorsese's great films.

The Irishman reminds me a bit of Tarantino's recent hit Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood, both because it's a period piece and also because you need to know a little history to understand the direction of the narrative. The movie, while following Frank Sheeran (Robert De Niro) as the titular character, revolves around Teamsters union boss James Riddle Hoffa (played with intense and hilarious fervor by Al Pacino). Fortunately Frank goes to great lengths to narrate the story for the audience and provides a healthy dose of context for those of us not from the Kennedy era. The main thing you need to know going in is that Jimmy Hoffa had mob ties, and that he vanished in 1975 and was presumed murdered by mob bosses for being "uncooperative".

The movie unfolds over four acts, told over several decades by Frank Sheeran. In act one, Frank is introduced as a WWII veteran who is stuck driving food delivery trucks in and around Philadelphia. He has the bright idea to steal some of the steaks that he's delivering, and sell them to local mobster Felix "Skinny Razor" DiTullio (Bobby Cannavale). Eventually his brazen willingness to break the law catches the eye of Italian mob boss Russell Bufalino (Joe Pesci), who happens to be a mobster on a national level. His calm demeanor is both comical yet terrifying. A soon to be classic line encompasses Bufalino perfectly: "You might be demonstrating a failure to show appreciation." Under his mentorship, Frank becomes a ruthless action man for the italian mob and explains with rather entertaining dispassion how he does his job properly. In act two, Russell introduces Frank to Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino), the outspoken and fearless president of the National Teamsters Union. Their relationship grows and Hoffa becomes Frank's second mentor. Together they use intimidation and bribery to gain influence until the election of John Kennedy, who subsequently appoints his brother Bobby Kennedy as Attorney General and immediately goes after Hoffa.

The first two and a half hours are the most fun, and in particular the end of act three is some of the most tense and dramatic storytelling that I have had the pleasure of seeing in recent memory. At a dinner celebration for Frank (who eventually becomes a Teamster boss himself), tensions between Hoffa, Bufalino and the other mobsters reaches a breaking point, and the decision is made to make Hoffa disappear. But in a gut wrenching twist, Frank is the one tasked to do the job. In a beautiful display of cinematography over a thirty-minute buildup, Scorsese forces the viewer to the edge of their seats with the dread of what's about to happen. Robert De Niro's performance in these moments is master class; the inner conflict is all the more apparent thanks all of the time we spent watching Frank being raised by Bufalino and Hoffa in equal measure. I plan to watch this part of the film again, probably with a notepad.

Getting away from the plot a bit, the movie is actually surprisingly funny. In one particular scene, someone insults an older Bufalino at a dinner reception. He and Frank exchange glances, and the frame suddenly cuts to a hotel bed covered in guns. Frank then narrates with excess detail and hilarious dispassion the ideal weapon for a public assassination. Moments like these are littered throughout the film and keep it from getting too bogged down in it's violence. It's impressive how quickly jokes fly, given the disproportionate amount of people getting shot point blank in the head. But anyone who has seen Scorsese's Goodfellas or The Departed will feel right at home.

The heart of the movie is definitely Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci. De Niro was de-aged with apparently exorbitantly priced CGI, as he is supposed to be younger than both Pacino and Pesci. While it's fairly obvious, I was never too distracted to not enjoy what was unfolding onscreen. Plus he's kind of made a career of holding one scowling facial expression, so that probably was a little easier to edit. Al Pacino is a riot as Hoffa, and is certainly one of the most arrogant, over-the-top characters that Pacino has played in awhile. Pesci as Bufalino is chilling, and it's fun to seem him as the boss in this gangster movie after being a junior-level mobster in Goodfellas so many years ago. The mentorship between De Niro's character and both Pacino and Pesci is amazingly entertaining.

The only thing keeping me from calling this movie perfect is it's length. Three hours and (almost) thirty minutes is a very long time, and while occurring infrequently the movie does drag a bit. This is most apparent in the fourth act where Frank introspects during his final years, and attempts to achieve reconciliation for all the murders he's committed. It doesn't really offer any closure or seem necessary to wrapping up the narrative.

Ultimately that doesn't even come close to making me not recommend seeing The Irishman. There's a reason Martin Scorsese will forever be known for his gangster movies. Combining comedy, violence, brotherhood and drama, he has created a formula that continues to work. The fact that he continues to make excellent movies at 76 years old blows my mind. Well done.

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